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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 10, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 10, 1105–1124, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-1105-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 10, 1105–1124, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-1105-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 26 May 2016

Research article | 26 May 2016

Modeling debris-covered glaciers: response to steady debris deposition

Leif S. Anderson and Robert S. Anderson
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Leif Anderson on behalf of the Authors (14 Mar 2016)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Apr 2016) by Tobias Bolch
RR by Andreas Vieli (12 Apr 2016)
RR by Ann Rowan (13 Apr 2016)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (18 Apr 2016) by Tobias Bolch
AR by Leif Anderson on behalf of the Authors (27 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Mountains erode and shed rocks down slope. When these rocks (debris) fall on glacier ice they can suppress ice melt. By protecting glaciers from melt, debris can make glaciers extend to lower elevations. Using mathematical models of glaciers and debris deposition, we find that debris can more than double the length of glaciers. The amount of debris deposited on the glacier, which scales with mountain height and steepness, is the most important control on debris-covered glacier length and volume.
Mountains erode and shed rocks down slope. When these rocks (debris) fall on glacier ice they...
Citation