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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 10, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 10, 133–148, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-133-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 10, 133–148, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-133-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 18 Jan 2016

Research article | 18 Jan 2016

Climatic controls and climate proxy potential of Lewis Glacier, Mt. Kenya

R. Prinz et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Rainer Prinz on behalf of the Authors (26 Nov 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (23 Dec 2015) by Andrew Klein
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Lewis Glacier has lost > 80 % of its extent since the late 19th century. A sensitivity study using a process-based model assigns this shrinking to decreased atmospheric moisture without increasing air temperatures required. The glacier retreat implies a distinctly different coupling between the glacier's surface-air layer and its surrounding boundary layer, underlining the difficulty of deriving palaeoclimates for larger glacier extents on the basis of modern measurements of small glaciers.
Lewis Glacier has lost 80 % of its extent since the late 19th century. A sensitivity study...
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