Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
The Cryosphere, 10, 2099-2111, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-2099-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
15 Sep 2016
Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability
Christo Buizert and Jeffrey P. Severinghaus
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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RC1: 'Review Buizert+Severinghaus', Anonymous Referee #1, 13 Jul 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Author response to Reviewer 1 comments', Christo Buizert, 13 Aug 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Review of "Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability" by Christo Buizert and Jeffrey P. Severinghaus', Cathy Trudinger, 19 Jul 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Author response to Reviewer 2 (Dr. Cathy Trudinger) comments', Christo Buizert, 13 Aug 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
EC1: 'Editor comment', Eric Wolff, 11 Aug 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Christo Buizert on behalf of the Authors (13 Aug 2016)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Aug 2016) by Eric Wolff  
CC BY 4.0
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Short summary
The upper 50–100 m of the world's ice sheets consists of the firn layer, a porous layer of snow that is slowly compacted by overlying snow. Understanding air movement inside the firn is critical for ice core climate reconstructions. Buizert and Severinghaus identify and describe a new mechanism of firn air movement. High- and low-pressure systems force air movement in the firn that drives strong mixing, called dispersion. Dispersion is the main mechanism for air mixing in the deep firn.
The upper 50–100 m of the world's ice sheets consists of the firn layer, a porous layer of snow...
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