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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 11, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 11, 1091–1110, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1091-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 11, 1091–1110, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1091-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 05 May 2017

Research article | 05 May 2017

In situ continuous visible and near-infrared spectroscopy of an alpine snowpack

Marie Dumont et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Marie Dumont on behalf of the Authors (21 Feb 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Mar 2017) by Martin Schneebeli
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Mar 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Mar 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (29 Mar 2017) by Martin Schneebeli
AR by Marie Dumont on behalf of the Authors (03 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Snow spectral albedo in the visible/near-infrared range has been continuously measured during a winter season at Col de Porte alpine site (French Alps; 45.30° N, 5.77°E; 1325 m a.s.l.). This study highlights that the variations of spectral albedo can be successfully explained by variations of the following snow surface variables: snow-specific surface area, effective light-absorbing impurities content, presence of liquid water and slope.
Snow spectral albedo in the visible/near-infrared range has been continuously measured during a...
Citation