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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 11, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 11, 1247–1264, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1247-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 11, 1247–1264, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1247-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 24 May 2017

Research article | 24 May 2017

Self-affine subglacial roughness: consequences for radar scattering and basal water discrimination in northern Greenland

Thomas M. Jordan et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR by Thomas Jordan on behalf of the Authors (13 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (21 Apr 2017) by Olaf Eisen
AR by Thomas Jordan on behalf of the Authors (21 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Using radio-echo sounding data from northern Greenland, we demonstrate that subglacial roughness exhibits self-affine (fractal) scaling behaviour. This enables us to assess topographic control upon the bed-echo waveform, and explain the spatial distribution of the degree of scattering (specular and diffuse reflections). Via comparison with a prediction for the basal thermal state (thawed and frozen regions of the bed) we discuss the consequences of our study for basal water discrimination.
Using radio-echo sounding data from northern Greenland, we demonstrate that subglacial roughness...
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