Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year 5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore 4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H index value: 55 Scimago H index 55
Volume 11, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 11, 1327-1332, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1327-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 11, 1327-1332, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-1327-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Brief communication 06 Jun 2017

Brief communication | 06 Jun 2017

Brief communication: The global signature of post-1900 land ice wastage on vertical land motion

Riccardo E. M. Riva1, Thomas Frederikse1, Matt A. King2, Ben Marzeion3, and Michiel R. van den Broeke4 Riccardo E. M. Riva et al.
  • 1Department Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2618 CN, the Netherlands
  • 2Surveying and Spatial Sciences, School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
  • 3Institute of Geography, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
  • 4Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands

Abstract. Melting glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets have made an important contribution to sea-level rise through the last century. Self-attraction and loading effects driven by shrinking ice masses cause a spatially varying redistribution of ocean waters that affects reconstructions of past sea level from sparse observations. We model the solid-earth response to ice mass changes and find significant vertical deformation signals over large continental areas. We show how deformation rates have been strongly varying through the last century, which implies that they should be properly modelled before interpreting and extrapolating recent observations of vertical land motion and sea-level change.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The reduction of ice masses stored on land has made an important contribution to sea-level rise over the last century, as well as changed the Earth's shape. We model the solid-earth response to ice mass changes and find significant vertical deformation signals over large continental areas. We show how deformation rates have varied strongly throughout the last century, which affects the interpretation and extrapolation of recent observations of vertical land motion and sea-level change.
The reduction of ice masses stored on land has made an important contribution to sea-level rise...
Citation
Share