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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 11, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 11, 2463-2480, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-2463-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 11, 2463-2480, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-2463-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 03 Nov 2017

Research article | 03 Nov 2017

Monitoring tropical debris-covered glacier dynamics from high-resolution unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

Oliver Wigmore and Bryan Mark
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Oliver Wigmore on behalf of the Authors (22 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (30 Aug 2017) by Chris R. Stokes
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Using a drone custom built for high altitude flight (4000–6000 m) we completed repeat surveys of Llaca Glacier in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. Analysis of high resolution imagery and elevation data reveals highly heterogeneous patterns of glacier change and the important role of ice cliffs in glacier melt dynamics. Drones are found to provide a viable and potentially transformative method for studying glacier change at high spatial resolution, on demand and at relatively low cost.
Using a drone custom built for high altitude flight (4000–6000 m) we completed repeat surveys of...
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