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Volume 11, issue 6 | Copyright
The Cryosphere, 11, 2743-2753, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-11-2743-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 05 Dec 2017

Research article | 05 Dec 2017

Centuries of intense surface melt on Larsen C Ice Shelf

Suzanne L. Bevan et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Suzanne Bevan on behalf of the Authors (09 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (01 Nov 2017) by G. Hilmar Gudmundsson
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Five 90 m boreholes drilled into an Antarctic Peninsula ice shelf show units of ice that are denser than expected and must have formed from refrozen surface melt which has been buried and transported downstream. We used surface flow speeds and snow accumulation rates to work out where and when these units formed. Results show that, as well as recent surface melt, a period of strong melt occurred during the 18th century. Surface melt is thought to be a factor in causing recent ice-shelf break-up.
Five 90 m boreholes drilled into an Antarctic Peninsula ice shelf show units of ice that are...
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