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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Volume 12, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 12, 1887–1898, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1887-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 1887–1898, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1887-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Jun 2018

Research article | 06 Jun 2018

Spring snow albedo feedback over northern Eurasia: Comparing in situ measurements with reanalysis products

Martin Wegmann et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Martin Wegmann on behalf of the Authors (16 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 Mar 2018) by Michiel van den Broeke
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (10 Apr 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Apr 2018) by Michiel van den Broeke
AR by Martin Wegmann on behalf of the Authors (23 Apr 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (27 Apr 2018) by Michiel van den Broeke
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
An important factor for Earth's climate is the high sunlight reflectivity of snow. By melting, it reveals darker surfaces and sunlight is converted to heat. We investigate how well this process is represented in reanalyses data sets compared to observations over Russia. We found snow processes to be well represented, but reflectivity variability needs to be improved. Our results highlight the need for a better representation of this key climate change feedback process in modelled data.
An important factor for Earth's climate is the high sunlight reflectivity of snow. By melting,...
Citation