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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Volume 12, issue 10
The Cryosphere, 12, 3293-3309, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3293-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 3293-3309, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3293-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 11 Oct 2018

Research article | 11 Oct 2018

Carbonaceous material export from Siberian permafrost tracked across the Arctic Shelf using Raman spectroscopy

Robert B. Sparkes et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR by R. Sparkes on behalf of the Authors (17 Aug 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Sep 2018) by Florent Dominé
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Ongoing climate change in the Siberian Arctic region has the potential to release large amounts of carbon, currently stored in permafrost, to the Arctic Shelf. Degradation can release this to the atmosphere as greenhouse gas. We used Raman spectroscopy to analyse a fraction of this carbon, carbonaceous material, a group that includes coal, lignite and graphite. We were able to trace this carbon from the river mouths and coastal erosion sites across the Arctic shelf for hundreds of kilometres.
Ongoing climate change in the Siberian Arctic region has the potential to release large amounts...
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