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TC | Volume 12, issue 10
The Cryosphere, 12, 3373–3382, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3373-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 3373–3382, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3373-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 26 Oct 2018

Research article | 26 Oct 2018

Arctic climate: changes in sea ice extent outweigh changes in snow cover

Aaron Letterly et al.
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Cited articles  
Cess, R. D. and Potter, G. L.: A Methodology for Understanding and Intercomparing Atmospheric Climate Feedback Processes in General Circulation Models, J. Geophys. Res., 93, 8305–8314, 1988. 
Déry, S. J. and Brown, R. D.: Recent Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent trends and implications for the snow-albedo feedback, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L22504, https://doi.org/10.1029/2007GL031474, 2007. 
Fernandes, R., Zhao, H., Wang, X., Key, J., Qu, X., and Hall, A.: Controls on Northern Hemisphere snow albedo feedback quantified using satellite Earth observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L21702, https://doi.org/10.1029/2009GL040057, 2009. 
Flanner, M. M., Shell, K. M., Barlage, M., Perovich, D. K., and Tschudi, M.: Radiative forcing and albedo feedback from the Northern Hemisphere cryosphere between 1979 and 2008, Nat. Geosci., 4, 151–155, https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo1062, 2011. 
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Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice and snow cover on Arctic land have led to increases in absorbed solar energy by the surface. Does one play a more important role in Arctic climate change? Using 34 years of satellite data we found that solar energy absorption increased by 10 % over the ocean, which was 3 times greater than over land. Therefore, the decreasing sea ice cover, not changes in terrestrial snow cover, has been the dominant feedback mechanism over the last few decades.
Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice and snow cover on Arctic land have led to increases in...
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