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TC | Volume 13, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 13, 1–20, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 13, 1–20, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 02 Jan 2019

Research article | 02 Jan 2019

Definition differences and internal variability affect the simulated Arctic sea ice melt season

Abigail Smith and Alexandra Jahn

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Cited articles

Barnhart, K. R., Miller, C. R., Overeem, I., and Kay, J. E.: Mapping the future expansion of Arctic open water, Nat. Clim. Change, 6, 1–36, https://doi.org/10.1038/NCLIMATE2848, 2016. a, b
Belchanksy, G., Douglas, D., and Platonov, N.: Duration of the Arctic Sea Ice Melt Season: Regional and Interannual Variability, J. Climate, 17, 67–80, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0442(2004)017<0067:DOTASI>2.0.CO;2, 2004. a
Bitz, C. and Roe, G.: Low-frequency variability in the Arctic atmosphere, sea ice, and upper-ocean climate system, J. Climate, 9, 3623–3632, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0442(1996)009<0394:LFVITA>2.0.CO;2, 1996. a
Bitz, C. M. and Roe, G. H.: A Mechanism for the High Rate of Sea Ice Thinning in the Arctic Ocean, J. Climate, 17, 3623–3632, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0442(2004)017<3623:AMFTHR>2.0.CO;2, 2004. a, b
Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E., Farrell, S. L., Newman, T., and Bitz, C. M.: Snow cover on Arctic sea ice in observations and an Earth System Model, Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 10342–10348, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015GL066049, 2015. a, b
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Here we assessed how natural climate variations and different definitions impact the diagnosed and projected Arctic sea ice melt season length using model simulations. Irrespective of the definition or natural variability, the sea ice melt season is projected to lengthen, potentially by as much as 4–5 months by 2100 under the business as usual scenario. We also find that different definitions have a bigger impact on melt onset, while natural variations have a bigger impact on freeze onset.
Here we assessed how natural climate variations and different definitions impact the diagnosed...
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