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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Volume 13, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 13, 1959–1981, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1959-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 13, 1959–1981, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-1959-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 17 Jul 2019

Research article | 17 Jul 2019

Past water flow beneath Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers, West Antarctica

James D. Kirkham et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Jun 2019) by Chris R. Stokes
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (26 Jun 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (26 Jun 2019) by Chris R. Stokes
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
A series of huge (500 m wide, 50 m deep) channels were eroded by water flowing beneath Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers in the past. The channels are similar to canyon systems produced by floods of meltwater released beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet millions of years ago. The spatial extent of the channels formed beneath Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers demonstrates significant quantities of water, possibly discharged from trapped subglacial lakes, flowed beneath these glaciers in the past.
A series of huge (500 m wide, 50 m deep) channels were eroded by water flowing beneath Pine...
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