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TC | Volume 13, issue 10
The Cryosphere, 13, 2693–2712, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2693-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 13, 2693–2712, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2693-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 15 Oct 2019

Research article | 15 Oct 2019

Regional influence of ocean–atmosphere teleconnections on the timing and duration of MODIS-derived snow cover in British Columbia, Canada

Alexandre R. Bevington et al.
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Aug 2019) by Marie Dumont
AR by Alexandre Bevington on behalf of the Authors (08 Aug 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Aug 2019) by Marie Dumont
AR by Alexandre Bevington on behalf of the Authors (23 Aug 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Sep 2019) by Marie Dumont
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We investigate the influence of ocean–atmosphere teleconnections on the start, end, and duration of snow cover in British Columbia, Canada. We do this using daily satellite imagery from 2002 to 2018 and assess the accuracy of our methods using reported snow cover at 60 weather stations. We found that there are very strong relationships that vary by region and elevation. This improves our understanding of snow cover distribution and could be used to predict snow cover from ocean–climate indices.
We investigate the influence of ocean–atmosphere teleconnections on the start, end, and duration...
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