Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year
    5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore
    4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 55 Scimago H
    index 55
Volume 3, issue 2
The Cryosphere, 3, 147-154, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-3-147-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 3, 147-154, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-3-147-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  02 Jul 2009

02 Jul 2009

Frost flower chemical signature in winter snow on Vestfonna ice cap, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard

E. Beaudon1 and J. Moore1,2,3 E. Beaudon and J. Moore
  • 1Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, P.O. Box 122, 96101 Rovaniemi, Finland
  • 2Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland
  • 3College of Global Change and Earth System Science Beijing Normal University, 19 Xinjiekou Wai Street, Beijing, 100875 China

Abstract. The chemistry of snow and ice cores from Svalbard is influenced by variations in local sea ice margin and distance to open water. Snow pits sampled at two summits of Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard), exhibit spatially heterogeneous soluble ions concentrations despite similar accumulation rates, reflecting the importance of small-scale weather patterns on this island ice cap. The snow pack on the western summit shows higher average values of marine ions and a winter snow layer that is relatively depleted in sulphate. One part of the winter snow pack exhibits a [SO42-/Na+] ratio reduced by two thirds compared with its ratio in sea water. This low sulphate content in winter snow is interpreted as the signature of frost flowers, which are formed on young sea ice when offshore winds predominate. Frost flowers have been described as the dominant source of sea salt to aerosol and precipitation in ice cores in coastal Antarctica but this is the first time their chemical signal has been described in the Arctic. The eastern summit does not show any frost flower signature and we interpret the unusually dynamic ice transport and rapid formation of thin ice on the Hinlopen Strait as the source of the frost flowers.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation
Share