Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year 5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore 4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H index value: 55 Scimago H index 55
The Cryosphere, 7, 797-816, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-7-797-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
06 May 2013
Speedup and fracturing of George VI Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula
T. O. Holt1, N. F. Glasser1, D. J. Quincey2, and M. R. Siegfried3 1Centre for Glaciology, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth SY23 3DB, UK
2School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
3Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla CA 92093, USA
Abstract. George VI Ice Shelf (GVIIS) is located on the Antarctic Peninsula, a region where several ice shelves have undergone rapid breakup in response to atmospheric and oceanic warming. We use a combination of optical (Landsat), radar (ERS 1/2 SAR) and laser altimetry (GLAS) datasets to examine the response of GVIIS to environmental change and to offer an assessment on its future stability. The spatial and structural changes of GVIIS (ca. 1973 to ca. 2010) are mapped and surface velocities are calculated at different time periods (InSAR and optical feature tracking from 1989 to 2009) to document changes in the ice shelf's flow regime. Surface elevation changes are recorded between 2003 and 2008 using repeat track ICESat acquisitions. We note an increase in fracture extent and distribution at the south ice front, ice-shelf acceleration towards both the north and south ice fronts and spatially varied negative surface elevation change throughout, with greater variations observed towards the central and southern regions of the ice shelf. We propose that whilst GVIIS is in no imminent danger of collapse, it is vulnerable to ongoing atmospheric and oceanic warming and is more susceptible to breakup along its southern margin in ice preconditioned for further retreat.

Citation: Holt, T. O., Glasser, N. F., Quincey, D. J., and Siegfried, M. R.: Speedup and fracturing of George VI Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, The Cryosphere, 7, 797-816, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-7-797-2013, 2013.
Publications Copernicus
Download
Share