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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 8, issue 4
The Cryosphere, 8, 1261-1273, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-8-1261-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 8, 1261-1273, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-8-1261-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 18 Jul 2014

Research article | 18 Jul 2014

A high-resolution bedrock map for the Antarctic Peninsula

M. Huss*,2,1 and D. Farinotti3 M. Huss and D. Farinotti
  • 1Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW), ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2Department of Geosciences, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland
  • 3German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
  • *Invited contribution by M. Huss, recipient of the EGU Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists 2014.

Abstract. Assessing and projecting the dynamic response of glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula to changed atmospheric and oceanic forcing requires high-resolution ice thickness data as an essential geometric constraint for ice flow models. Here, we derive a complete bedrock data set for the Antarctic Peninsula north of 70° S on a 100 m grid. We calculate distributed ice thickness based on surface topography and simple ice dynamic modelling. Our approach is constrained with all available thickness measurements from Operation IceBridge and gridded ice flow speeds for the entire study region. The new data set resolves the rugged subglacial topography in great detail, indicates deeply incised troughs, and shows that 34% of the ice volume is grounded below sea level. The Antarctic Peninsula has the potential to raise global sea level by 69 ± 5 mm. In comparison to Bedmap2, covering all Antarctica on a 1 km grid, a significantly higher mean ice thickness (+48%) is found.

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