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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 9, issue 6
The Cryosphere, 9, 2219-2235, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-2219-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 9, 2219-2235, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-2219-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 01 Dec 2015

Research article | 01 Dec 2015

Observations of seasonal and diurnal glacier velocities at Mount Rainier, Washington, using terrestrial radar interferometry

K. E. Allstadt et al.
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (13 Nov 2015)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 Nov 2015) by Olivier Gagliardini
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Terrestrial radar interferometry measurements allow us to capture the entire velocity field of several alpine glaciers at Mount Rainier, WA, and investigate glacier dynamics. We analyze spatial patterns and compare repeat measurements to investigate diurnal and seasonal glacier changes. We find no significant diurnal variability but a very large seasonal slowdown (25 to 50%) from July to November likely due to changes in subglacial water storage. Modeling suggests 91-99% of motion is sliding.
Terrestrial radar interferometry measurements allow us to capture the entire velocity field of...
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