Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
TC cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Florent
 
Dominé
,
Olaf
 
Eisen
,
Stephan
 
Gruber
,
G. Hilmar
 
Gudmundsson
 &
Thomas
 
Mölg

The Cryosphere (TC) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of frozen water and ground on Earth and on other planetary bodies.

The main subject areas are ice sheets and glaciers, planetary ice bodies, permafrost, river and lake ice, seasonal snow cover, sea ice, remote sensing, numerical modelling, in situ and laboratory studies of the above and including studies of the interaction of the cryosphere with the rest of the climate system.

News

International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSN) now includable in article assets

19 May 2017

Since early 2016, Copernicus Publications has been enabling authors to connect their articles with underlying or related material such as research data, model code, or scientific videos. To enhance reproducibility it is now also possible to include International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) as assets.

EGU journals: celebrations and growth

16 May 2017

In 2016, the 17 EGU–Copernicus peer-reviewed open-access journals experienced significant growth. We published over 3300 final-revised papers, corresponding to some 53,500 pages, a growth of about 10% compared to the previous year. These papers were downloaded over 645,000 times.

How and why The Cryosphere was born 10 years ago

25 Apr 2017

Ten years back, cryosphere-related papers were scattered through EGU publications, while at the same time the cryosphere programme at EGU was rapidly growing. Jonathan Bamber undertook a survey of the community and on the basis of this convinced EGU to launch The Cryosphere. Please celebrate with us the 10th anniversary of TC during an evening reception, open to all, at the EGU General Assembly 2017 in Vienna, taking place in room G2 (Brown Level – Basement), Thursday, 27th April, 19:00.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

This work defines a metric for evaluation of a specific model snow process, namely, heat transfer through snow into soil. Heat transfer through snow regulates the difference in air temperature versus soil temperature. Accurate representation of the snow heat transfer process is critically important for accurate representation of the current and future state of permafrost. Utilizing this metric, we can clearly identify models that can and cannot reasonably represent snow heat transfer.

Andrew G. Slater, David M. Lawrence, and Charles D. Koven

Recent surging of Kyagar Glacier (Karakoram) caused a hazardous ice-dammed lake to form and burst in 2015 and 2016. We use remotely sensed glacier surface velocities and surface elevation to observe dramatic changes in speed and mass distribution during the surge. The surge was hydrologically controlled with rapid summer onset and dramatic termination following lake outburst. Since the surge, the potential outburst hazard has remained high, and continued remote monitoring is crucial.

Vanessa Round, Silvan Leinss, Matthias Huss, Christoph Haemmig, and Irena Hajnsek

We simulate the future snow cover in the Alps with the help of a snow model, which is fed by projected temperature and precipitation changes from a large set of climate models. The results demonstrate that snow below 1000 m is probably a rare guest at the end of the century. Moreover, even above 3000 m the simulations show a drastic decrease in snow depth. However, the results reveal that the projected snow cover reduction can be mitigated by 50 % if we manage to keep global warming below 2°.

Christoph Marty, Sebastian Schlögl, Mathias Bavay, and Michael Lehning

Previous geodetic estimates of glacier mass changes in the Karakoram have revealed balanced budgets or a possible slight mass gain since the year ~2000. We used old US reconnaissance imagery and could show that glaciers in the Hunza River basin (Central Karakoram) experienced on average no significant mass changes also since the 1970s. Likewise the glaciers had heterogeneous behaviour with frequent surge activities during the last 40 years.

Tobias Bolch, Tino Pieczonka, Kriti Mukherjee, and Joseph Shea

In this paper we investigate elevation changes of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica, one of the main sources of excess ice discharge into the ocean. We find that in early 2013, four subglacial lakes separated by 100 km drained suddenly, discharging more than 3 cubic kilometres of water under the fastest part of the glacier in less than 6 months. Concurrent ice-speed measurements show only minor changes, suggesting that ice dynamics are not strongly sensitive to changes in water flow.

Benjamin E. Smith, Noel Gourmelen, Alexander Huth, and Ian Joughin

Publications Copernicus