Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.906 IF 4.906
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 5.178 IF 5-year
    5.178
  • SNIP value: 1.589 SNIP 1.589
  • IPP value: 5.158 IPP 5.158
  • SJR value: 3.518 SJR 3.518
  • h5-index value: 41 h5-index 41
TC cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Jonathan
 
Bamber
,
Florent
 
Dominé
,
Stephan
 
Gruber
,
G. Hilmar
 
Gudmundsson
 &
Michiel
 
van den Broeke

The Cryosphere (TC) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of frozen water and ground on Earth and on other planetary bodies.

The main subject areas are ice sheets and glaciers, planetary ice bodies, permafrost, river and lake ice, seasonal snow cover, sea ice, remote sensing, numerical modelling, in situ and laboratory studies of the above and including studies of the interaction of the cryosphere with the rest of the climate system.

News

Press Release: New technique settles old debate on highest peaks in US Arctic

23 Jun 2016

Ski mountaineer Kit DesLauriers joined forces with glaciologist Matt Nolan to settle a debate of more than 50 years, while testing a new, affordable mapping technique in a steep mountainous region.

Institutional agreement for TC authors affiliated with the Leibniz Universität Hannover

11 Jan 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) in Hanover, Germany have signed an agreement on central billing of article processing charges.

Workflow of TC reorganized

10 Dec 2015

We have summarized the upcoming changes to TC by the end of the year.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

We measured the heights of the five tallest peaks in the US Arctic using fodar, a new airborne photogrammetric technique using structure-from-motion software. The highest peaks are Mt Isto (2735.6 m), Mt. Hubley (2717.6 m), Mt. Chamberlin (2712.3 m), Mt. Michelson (2698.1 m), and an unnamed peak (2694.9 m). We found fodar suitable for topographic change detection on the centimeter scale in steep mountain terrain, such as for measuring snow depths.

M. Nolan and K. DesLauriers

We compared satellite-derived estimates of spatial and seasonal variations in Greenland Ice Sheet mass with a set of model simulations, revealing an agreement between models and satellite estimates for the ice-sheet-wide seasonal fluctuations in mass, but disagreement at finer spatial scales. The model simulations underestimate low-elevation mass loss. Improving the ability of models to capture variations and trends in Greenland Ice Sheet mass is important for estimating future sea level rise.

P. M. Alexander, M. Tedesco, N.-J. Schlegel, S. B. Luthcke, X. Fettweis, and E. Larour

We present an extensive data set of ground-based and airborne electromagnetic ice thickness measurements covering Fram Strait in summer between 2001 and 2012. An investigation of back trajectories of surveyed sea ice using satellite-based sea ice motion data allows us to examine the connection between thickness variability, ice age and source area. In addition, we determine across and along strait gradients in ice thickness and associated volume fluxes.

T. Krumpen, R. Gerdes, C. Haas, S. Hendricks, A. Herber, V. Selyuzhenok, L. Smedsrud, and G. Spreen

We show that strong electrical self-potential fields are generated in melting in in situ snowpacks at Rhone Glacier and Jungfraujoch Glacier, Switzerland. We conclude that the electrical self-potential method is a promising snow and firn hydrology sensor, owing to its suitability for sensing lateral and vertical liquid water flows directly and minimally invasively, complementing established observational programs and monitoring autonomously at a low cost.

S. S. Thompson, B. Kulessa, R. L. H. Essery, and M. P. Lüthi

We calibrate a time-dependent ice model through optimal fit to transient observations of surface elevation and velocity, a novel procedure in glaciology and in particular for an ice stream with a dynamic grounding line. We show this procedure gives a level of confidence in model projections that cannot be achieved through more commonly used glaciological data assimilation methods. We show that Smith Glacier is in a state of retreat regardless of climatic forcing for the next several decades.

D. N. G. Goldberg, P. H. Heimbach, I. J. Joughin, and B. E. S. Smith

Publications Copernicus