Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
TC cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Jonathan
 
Bamber
,
Florent
 
Dominé
,
Stephan
 
Gruber
,
G. Hilmar
 
Gudmundsson
 &
Thomas
 
Mölg

The Cryosphere (TC) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of frozen water and ground on Earth and on other planetary bodies.

The main subject areas are ice sheets and glaciers, planetary ice bodies, permafrost, river and lake ice, seasonal snow cover, sea ice, remote sensing, numerical modelling, in situ and laboratory studies of the above and including studies of the interaction of the cryosphere with the rest of the climate system.

News

Press Release: Less snow and a shorter ski season in the Alps

16 Feb 2017

A study published today in The Cryosphere shows bare Alpine slopes could be a much more common sight in the future.

A case of editorial malpractice detected

13 Feb 2017

Recently we have become aware of a case of scientific malpractice by an editor of two of our journals (SOIL and SE) who used the position as editor and reviewer to disproportionately promote citations to personal papers and associated journals. Please read the published editorial.

New institutional agreement between the TU Darmstadt and Copernicus Publications

27 Dec 2016

Authors from the Technical University Darmstadt will profit from a new institutional agreement with Copernicus Publications starting 1 January 2017. The agreement which is valid for corresponding authors enables a direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the university and the publisher.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

We simulate the future snow cover in the Alps with the help of a snow model, which is fed by projected temperature and precipitation changes from a large set of climate models. The results demonstrate that snow below 1000 m is probably a rare guest at the end of the century. Moreover, even above 3000 m the simulations show a drastic decrease in snow depth. However, the results reveal that the projected snow cover reduction can be mitigated by 50 % if we manage to keep global warming below 2°.

Christoph Marty, Sebastian Schlögl, Mathias Bavay, and Michael Lehning

Previous geodetic estimates of glacier mass changes in the Karakoram have revealed balanced budgets or a possible slight mass gain since the year ~2000. We used old US reconnaissance imagery and could show that glaciers in the Hunza River basin (Central Karakoram) experienced on average no significant mass changes also since the 1970s. Likewise the glaciers had heterogeneous behaviour with frequent surge activities during the last 40 years.

Tobias Bolch, Tino Pieczonka, Kriti Mukherjee, and Joseph Shea

In this paper we investigate elevation changes of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica, one of the main sources of excess ice discharge into the ocean. We find that in early 2013, four subglacial lakes separated by 100 km drained suddenly, discharging more than 3 cubic kilometres of water under the fastest part of the glacier in less than 6 months. Concurrent ice-speed measurements show only minor changes, suggesting that ice dynamics are not strongly sensitive to changes in water flow.

Benjamin E. Smith, Noel Gourmelen, Alexander Huth, and Ian Joughin

Based on DEM simulations we developed a new model for the onset of crack propagation in snow slab avalanche release. The model reconciles past approaches by considering the complex interplay between slab elasticity and the mechanical behavior of the weak layer including its structural collapse. The model agrees with extensive field data and can reproduce crack propagation on low-angle terrain and the decrease in critical crack length with increasing slope angle observed in numerical experiments.

Johan Gaume, Alec van Herwijnen, Guillaume Chambon, Nander Wever, and Jürg Schweizer

The absorption of visible light in ice is very weak but its precise value is unknown. By measuring the profile of light intensity in snow, Warren and Brand (2006) deduced that light is attenuated by a factor 2 per kilometer in pure ice at a wavelength of 400 nm. We replicated their experiment on a large number of samples and found that ice absorption is at least 10 times stronger. The paper explores various potential physical and statistical biases that could impact the experiment.

Ghislain Picard, Quentin Libois, and Laurent Arnaud

Publications Copernicus