Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year 5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore 4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H index value: 55 Scimago H index 55
TC cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Florent
 
Dominé
,
Olaf
 
Eisen
,
Christian
 
Haas
,
Christian
 
Hauck
 &
Thomas
 
Mölg
The Cryosphere (TC) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of frozen water and ground on Earth and on other planetary bodies.
The main subject areas are ice sheets and glaciers, planetary ice bodies, permafrost, river and lake ice, seasonal snow cover, sea ice, remote sensing, numerical modelling, in situ and laboratory studies of the above and including studies of the interaction of the cryosphere with the rest of the climate system.
News
Press Release: New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse 19 Jul 2018

An international team of scientists has shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, two Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. The research is published today in TC.

New Journal Impact Factors released 27 Jun 2018

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

Farewell to Hilmar Gudmundsson and Welcome Christian Haas 15 May 2018

With Hilmar Gudmundsson one of the last editors from the early days of the journal is now stepping down. We are delighted to welcome his successor Christian Haas, who is an expert in sea ice physics and has been a TC topical editor for several years.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

Despite the speculation on the state and fate of Larsen C Ice Shelf, a key unknown factor remains: what would be the effects of ice-shelf collapse on upstream drainage basins and thus global sea levels? In our paper three state-of-the-art numerical ice-sheet models were used to simulate the volume evolution of the inland ice sheet to ice-shelf collapse at Larsen C and George VI ice shelves. Our results suggest sea-level rise of up to ~4 mm for Larsen C ice shelf and ~22 for George VI ice shelf.

Clemens Schannwell, Stephen Cornford, David Pollard, and Nicholas E. Barrand

Locating a suitable drill site is a key step in the Antarctic oldest-ice challenge. Here we have conducted a 3-D ice flow simulation in the region of Dome C using a refined bedrock description. Five selection criteria are computed that together provide an objective overview on the local ice flow conditions. We delineate kilometer-scale favorable areas that overlap with the ones recently proposed by another group. We propose a few drill sites that should be surveyed during the next field seasons.

Olivier Passalacqua, Marie Cavitte, Olivier Gagliardini, Fabien Gillet-Chaulet, Frédéric Parrenin, Catherine Ritz, and Duncan Young

In this paper we analyze snow data from Soviet airborne expeditions, Sever, which operated in late winter 1959–1986, in the Arctic and made snow measurements on the ice around plane landing sites. The snow measurements were made on the multiyear ice in the central Arctic and on the first-year ice in the Eurasian seas in the areas for which snow characteristics are poorly described in the literature. The main goal of this study is to produce an improved data set of snow depth on the sea ice.

Elena V. Shalina and Stein Sandven

Two recent studies suggested a slowdown in mass loss after 2000 of the Juneau and Stikine icefields, accounting for 10% of the total ice cover in Alaska. Here, the ASTER-based geodetic mass balances are revisited, carefully avoiding the use of the SRTM DEM, because of the unknown penetration depth of the SRTM C-band radar signal. We find strongly negative mass balances from 2000 to 2016 for both icefields, in agreement with airborne laser altimetry. Mass losses are thus continuing unabated.

Etienne Berthier, Christopher Larsen, William J. Durkin, Michael J. Willis, and Matthew E. Pritchard

Including ice sheets as an interactive component of an Earth-system model is challenging, as ice sheets evolve slowly in response to climate change (past, present & future). Long climate–ice sheet simulations often compromise the ability to resolve interactions (across space and time) in order to achieve computational efficiency. We show that this approach might be flawed, as it can yield large biases in the simulated climate that can in turn influence the ice sheet evolution.

Marcus Lofverstrom and Johan Liakka

Publications Copernicus