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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 10, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 10, 1245–1257, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-1245-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 10, 1245–1257, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-1245-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 23 Jun 2016

Research article | 23 Jun 2016

Which are the highest peaks in the US Arctic? Fodar settles the debate

Matt Nolan and Kit DesLauriers
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Matt Nolan on behalf of the Authors (15 Apr 2016)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (19 May 2016) by Andreas Kääb
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We measured the heights of the five tallest peaks in the US Arctic using fodar, a new airborne photogrammetric technique using structure-from-motion software. The highest peaks are Mt Isto (2735.6 m), Mt. Hubley (2717.6 m), Mt. Chamberlin (2712.3 m), Mt. Michelson (2698.1 m), and an unnamed peak (2694.9 m). We found fodar suitable for topographic change detection on the centimeter scale in steep mountain terrain, such as for measuring snow depths.
We measured the heights of the five tallest peaks in the US Arctic using fodar, a new airborne...
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