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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 10, issue 3
The Cryosphere, 10, 995–1002, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-995-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 10, 995–1002, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-10-995-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 12 May 2016

Research article | 12 May 2016

Multi-method observation and analysis of a tsunami caused by glacier calving

Martin P. Lüthi and Andreas Vieli
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Short summary
Glaciers flowing into the ocean sometimes release huge pieces of ice and cause violent tsunami waves which, upon landfall, can cause severe destruction. During an exceptionally well-documented event at Eqip Sermia, west Greenland, the collapse of a 200 m high ice cliff caused a tsunami wave of 50 m height, traveling at a speed exceeding 100 km h−1. This tsunami wave was filmed from a tour boat, and was simultaneously observed with several instruments, as was the run-up of 15 m on the shore.
Glaciers flowing into the ocean sometimes release huge pieces of ice and cause violent tsunami...
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