Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.524 IF 4.524
  • IF 5-year value: 5.558 IF 5-year 5.558
  • CiteScore value: 4.84 CiteScore 4.84
  • SNIP value: 1.425 SNIP 1.425
  • SJR value: 3.034 SJR 3.034
  • IPP value: 4.65 IPP 4.65
  • h5-index value: 52 h5-index 52
  • Scimago H index value: 55 Scimago H index 55
Volume 12, issue 4 | Copyright

Special issue: The World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation...

The Cryosphere, 12, 1293-1306, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1293-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 12 Apr 2018

Research article | 12 Apr 2018

Estimating the snow water equivalent on a glacierized high elevation site (Forni Glacier, Italy)

Antonella Senese1, Maurizio Maugeri1, Eraldo Meraldi2, Gian Pietro Verza3, Roberto Sergio Azzoni1, Chiara Compostella4, and Guglielmina Diolaiuti1 Antonella Senese et al.
  • 1Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
  • 2ARPA Lombardia, Centro Nivometeorologico di Bormio, Bormio, Italy
  • 3Ev-K2-CNR – Pakistan, Italian K2 Museum Skardu Gilgit Baltistan, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • 4Department of Earth Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy

Abstract. We present and compare 11 years of snow data (snow depth and snow water equivalent, SWE) measured by an automatic weather station (AWS) and corroborated by data from field campaigns on the Forni Glacier in Italy. The aim of the analysis is to estimate the SWE of new snowfall and the annual SWE peak based on the average density of the new snow at the site (corresponding to the snowfall during the standard observation period of 24h) and automated snow depth measurements. The results indicate that the daily SR50 sonic ranger measurements and the available snow pit data can be used to estimate the mean new snow density value at the site, with an error of ±6kgm−3. Once the new snow density is known, the sonic ranger makes it possible to derive SWE values with an RMSE of 45mm water equivalent (if compared with snow pillow measurements), which turns out to be about 8% of the total SWE yearly average. Therefore, the methodology we present is interesting for remote locations such as glaciers or high alpine regions, as it makes it possible to estimate the total SWE using a relatively inexpensive, low-power, low-maintenance, and reliable instrument such as the sonic ranger.

Download & links
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
We present and compare 11 years of snow data measured by an automatic weather station and corroborated by data from field campaigns on the Forni Glacier in Italy. The methodology we present is interesting for remote locations such as glaciers or high alpine regions, as it makes it possible to estimate the total snow water equivalent (SWE) using a relatively inexpensive, low-power, low-maintenance, and reliable instrument such as the sonic ranger.
We present and compare 11 years of snow data measured by an automatic weather station and...
Citation
Share