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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Volume 12, issue 5
The Cryosphere, 12, 1745–1766, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1745-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 1745–1766, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1745-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 24 May 2018

Research article | 24 May 2018

Archival processes of the water stable isotope signal in East Antarctic ice cores

Mathieu Casado et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Mathieu Casado on behalf of the Authors (22 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Mar 2018) by Martin Schneebeli
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (06 Apr 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Apr 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Apr 2018) by Martin Schneebeli
AR by Mathieu Casado on behalf of the Authors (20 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 Apr 2018) by Martin Schneebeli
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Ice core isotopic records rely on the knowledge of the processes involved in the archival processes of the snow. In the East Antarctic Plateau, post-deposition processes strongly affect the signal found in the surface and buried snow compared to the initial climatic signal. We evaluate the different contributions to the surface snow isotopic composition between the precipitation and the exchanges with the atmosphere and the variability of the isotopic signal found in profiles from snow pits.
Ice core isotopic records rely on the knowledge of the processes involved in the archival...
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