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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 12, 205–225, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-205-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 205–225, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-205-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 22 Jan 2018

Research article | 22 Jan 2018

Seafloor geomorphology of western Antarctic Peninsula bays: a signature of ice flow behaviour

Yuribia P. Munoz and Julia S. Wellner
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Yuribia Munoz on behalf of the Authors (04 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Nov 2017) by Chris R. Stokes
AR by Yuribia Munoz on behalf of the Authors (22 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We mapped submarine landforms in western Antarctic Peninsula bays. These landforms were formed by flowing ice and provide insight into the local controls on glacial ice advance and retreat. We combined data from various cruises to create seafloor maps. We conclude that the number of landforms found in the bays scales to the size of the bay, narrower bays tend to stabilize ice flow, and meltwater channels are abundant, and we hypothesize a recent glacial advance, likely the Little Ice Age.
We mapped submarine landforms in western Antarctic Peninsula bays. These landforms were formed...
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