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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Volume 12, issue 10
The Cryosphere, 12, 3311-3331, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3311-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 12, 3311-3331, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-3311-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 16 Oct 2018

Research article | 16 Oct 2018

19th century glacier retreat in the Alps preceded the emergence of industrial black carbon deposition on high-alpine glaciers

Michael Sigl et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Michael Sigl on behalf of the Authors (17 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 May 2018) by Becky Alexander
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (26 Jun 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (05 Jul 2018) by Becky Alexander
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (27 Aug 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (07 Sep 2018) by Becky Alexander
AR by Michael Sigl on behalf of the Authors (17 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Sep 2018) by Becky Alexander
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
The fast retreat of Alpine glaciers since the mid-19th century documented in photographs is used as a symbol for the human impact on global climate, yet the key driving forces remain elusive. Here we argue that not industrial soot but volcanic eruptions were responsible for an apparently accelerated deglaciation starting in the 1850s. Our findings support a negligible role of human activity in forcing glacier recession at the end of the Little Ice Age, highlighting the role of natural drivers.
The fast retreat of Alpine glaciers since the mid-19th century documented in photographs is used...
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