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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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TC | Volume 13, issue 7
The Cryosphere, 13, 2023–2041, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2023-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Oldest Ice: finding and interpreting climate proxies in ice...

The Cryosphere, 13, 2023–2041, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-13-2023-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 19 Jul 2019

Research article | 19 Jul 2019

Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet across the mid-Pleistocene transition – implications for Oldest Ice

Johannes Sutter et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Jun 2019) by Alexander Robinson
AR by Johannes Sutter on behalf of the Authors (15 Jun 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (01 Jul 2019) by Alexander Robinson
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
The Antarctic Ice Sheet may have played an important role in moderating the transition between warm and cold climate epochs over the last million years. We find that the Antarctic Ice Sheet grew considerably about 0.9 Myr ago, a time when ice-age–warm-age cycles changed from a 40 000 to a 100 000 year periodicity. Our findings also suggest that ice as old as 1.5 Myr still exists at the bottom of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet despite the major climate reorganisations in the past.
The Antarctic Ice Sheet may have played an important role in moderating the transition between...
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