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The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 9, issue 1
The Cryosphere, 9, 285–304, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-285-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Cryosphere, 9, 285–304, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-9-285-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 11 Feb 2015

Research article | 11 Feb 2015

Cloud and precipitation properties from ground-based remote-sensing instruments in East Antarctica

I. V. Gorodetskaya et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Irina V. Gorodetskaya on behalf of the Authors (07 Dec 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Dec 2014) by Martin Schneebeli
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (19 Dec 2014)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (19 Dec 2014) by Martin Schneebeli
AR by Irina V. Gorodetskaya on behalf of the Authors (23 Dec 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (05 Jan 2015) by Martin Schneebeli
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Our paper presents a new cloud-precipitation-meteorological observatory established in the escarpment zone of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. The site is characterised by bimodal cloud occurrence (clear sky or overcast) with liquid-containing clouds occurring 20% of the cloudy periods. Local surface mass balance strongly depends on rare intense snowfall events. A substantial part of the accumulated snow is removed by surface and drifting snow sublimation and wind-driven snow erosion.
Our paper presents a new cloud-precipitation-meteorological observatory established in the...
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