Journal cover Journal topic
The Cryosphere An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.516 IF 5.516
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 5.591 IF 5-year
    5.591
  • SNIP value: 1.403 SNIP 1.403
  • IPP value: 4.288 IPP 4.288
  • SJR value: 3.247 SJR 3.247
  • h5-index value: 34 h5-index 34
TC cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Jonathan L.
 
Bamber
,
Florent
 
Dominé
,
Stephan
 
Gruber
,
G. Hilmar
 
Gudmundsson
 &
Michiel
 
van den Broeke

The Cryosphere (TC) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of frozen water and ground on Earth and on other planetary bodies.

The main subject areas are ice sheets and glaciers, planetary ice bodies, permafrost, river and lake ice, seasonal snow cover, sea ice, remote sensing, numerical modelling, in situ and laboratory studies of the above and including studies of the interaction of the cryosphere with the rest of the climate system.

News

Update data policy

29 Jun 2015

We have updated our data policy: it now also refers to the Data Citation Principles and stresses the necessity of data availability.

TC awarded DOAJ Seal

25 Jun 2015

The Cryosphere (TC) has received the new DOAJ Seal which recognizes journals with an exceptionally high level of publishing standards and best practice.

New Journal Impact Factors released

19 Jun 2015

Thomson Reuters has published the latest Journal Citation Reports®. We are delighted to announce that the Impact Factor for The Cryosphere (TC) has risen in 2014. Congratulations!

Recent articles


Highlight articles

We use remotely sensed land surface temperature and land cover in conjunction with air temperature and snowfall from a reanalysis product as input for a simple permafrost model. The scheme is applied to the permafrost regions bordering the North Atlantic. A comparison with ground temperatures in boreholes suggests a modeling accuracy of 2 to 2.5 °C.

S. Westermann, T. I. Østby, K. Gisnås, T. V. Schuler, and B. Etzelmüller

Within the last year, a large rift in the southern part of the Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, propagated towards the inner part of the ice shelf. In this study we present the development of the rift as derived from remote sensing data and assess the impact of possible calving scenarios on the future stability of the Larsen C Ice Shelf, using a numerical model. We find that the calving front is likely to become unstable after the anticipated calving events.

D. Jansen, A. J. Luckman, A. Cook, S. Bevan, B. Kulessa, B. Hubbard, and P. R. Holland

Snow and ice provide large amounts of meltwater to the Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers. In this study we show that climate change will reduce the amount of snow falling in the Himalayas, Hindu Kush and Karakoram substantially. The limited number of observations in remote upper-level terrain makes it difficult to get a complete overview of the situation today, but our results indicate that by 2071–2100 snowfall may be reduced by 30–70% with the strongest anthropogenic forcing scenario.

E. Viste and A. Sorteberg

A glacier mass balance and redistribution model that integrates field observations and downscaled climate fields is developed to examine glacier sensitivity to future climate in the Everest region of Nepal.  The modelled sensitivity of glaciers to future climate change is high, and glacier mass loss is sustained through the 21st century for both middle- and high-emission scenarios.  Projected temperature increases will expose large glacier areas to melt and reduce snow accumulations.

J. M. Shea, W. W. Immerzeel, P. Wagnon, C. Vincent, and S. Bajracharya

We present a new glacier inventory for high-mountain Asia named “Glacier Area Mapping for Discharge from the Asian Mountains” (GAMDAM). Glacier outlines were delineated manually using 356 Landsat ETM+ scenes in 226 path-row sets from the period 1999–2003, in conjunction with a digital elevation model and high-resolution Google EarthTM imagery. Our GAMDAM Glacier Inventory includes 87,084 glaciers covering a total area of 91,263 ± 13,689 km2 throughout high-mountain Asia.

T. Nuimura, A. Sakai, K. Taniguchi, H. Nagai, D. Lamsal, S. Tsutaki, A. Kozawa, Y. Hoshina, S. Takenaka, S. Omiya, K. Tsunematsu, P. Tshering, and K. Fujita

Publications Copernicus